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Sustainable 2nd Century

Sustainable 2nd Century

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The Sustainable 2nd Century celebrates UC Davis’ long-term commitment to environmental, economic and social sustainability. We use our strengths in teaching, research and public service to address society’s most pressing problems. Ideas that start on our campus — powered by faculty, students and staff — transform the world. Learn more...

Recent news

  • 9.24.14 — UC Davis, SunPower to build largest solar power plant in UC system

    UC and SunPower Corp. plan to build a 16-megawatt, ground-mounted solar power plant that is expected to generate 14 percent of UC Davis’ electricity needs. The university anticipates that, when the plant is completed in 2015, more than one-third of total electricity demand on campus will be served from carbon neutral energy sources. On completion, the project will be the largest solar power installation in the University of California system, and the largest solar power plant to offset the electricity demand of a U.S. university or college campus.

  • 9.24.14 — Good catch: Fishermen clean ocean of lost crabbing gear

    California’s rugged North Coast lays claim to one of the state’s most valuable commercial fisheries: Dungeness crab. Millions of pounds of this meaty delicacy are pulled in each year from Morro Bay to the California-Oregon border, making for an industry valued at $32 million to $95 million per year. But there’s another catch: Many of the thousands of crab pots set in the sea don’t make their way back. Now, a group of fishermen collaborating with UC Davis are working to remove the lost crabbing gear from the ocean and sell it back to the original owners under what they hope will be an economically sustainable model for future cleanups.

  • 9.23.14 — Tercero 3: Our most sustainable residence halls yet

    The more than 1,300 students in UC Davis’ newest residence halls will be showered with sustainability. Literally. The students, who move in this weekend, will use a water supply that is heated with energy derived from water vapor formerly lost to the atmosphere, through the campus steam plant's boiler stacks.

  • 9.16.14 — Global shift to mass transit could save more than $100 trillion and 1,700 megatons of CO2

    More than $100 trillion in public and private spending could be saved between now and 2050 if the world expands public transportation, walking and cycling in cities, according to a new report released by UC Davis and the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy. Additionally, reductions in carbon dioxide emissions reaching 1,700 megatons per year in 2050 could be achieved if this shift occurs.

  • 9.11.14 — University lights the way for hospital energy savings

    As ambulances at a Vacaville hospital speed off to their next patient, an ultrasmart, energy-efficient system is lighting the way. Installed in partnership with UC Davis, the lighting system now illuminates the emergency vehicle routes, parking lots and outdoor walkways of the NorthBay VacaValley Hospital. The system is reducing outdoor lighting energy use at the 24-hour site by 66 percent, saving about 29,000 kilowatt-hours annually -- enough to offset the greenhouse gas emissions of 7.2 tons of waste.

  • 9.8.14 — China and UC Davis partner to put Zero Emission Vehicles on a faster track

    In a landmark international collaboration on clean vehicle adoption, UC Davis and the China Automotive Technology and Research Center will work together to help speed the commercialization of plug-in and fuel cell electric cars in China and the U.S. under an agreement signed Sept. 6 in Tianjin, China.

  • 8.19.14 — California has given away rights to far more water than it has

    California has allocated five times more surface water than the state actually has, making it hard for regulators to tell whose supplies should be cut during a drought, UC researchers reported.

  • 8.14.14 — State of the lake: High (tech) and dry at Tahoe

    Lowering a white disk off a boat and into Lake Tahoe’s blue waters was once the most widely used indicator of the lake’s clarity and health. Today, the Secchi disk is still an important tool, but 46 years after UC Davis first began continuous monitoring of Lake Tahoe, an array of new technologies and computer models are helping scientists better understand what has proven to be a complex ecosystem.

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